Are you ready to have your building rated?

  • The USRC Building Rating System assigns one to five stars along the dimensions of Safety, Damage expressed as repair cost and Recovery expressed as time to regain basic function. 
  • The SAFETY rating describes the potential for people in the building to get out of the building unharmed after an event. 
  • The DAMAGE rating describes the estimated cost to repair the building after an event as a percentage of the building’s replacement cost.
  • The RECOVERY rating expressed as the time to regain basic function is an estimate of the minimum time required to effect repairs and to remove safety hazards impeding use of the building.

A PLATINUM rating has five stars across all three dimensions.

A GOLD rating has at least four stars across all three dimensions.

A SILVER rating has at least three stars across all three dimensions.

A CERTIFIED rating has east three stars in the SAFETY dimension and two stars in DAMAGE and RECOVERY.

To learn more about receiving a SHELTER-IN-PLACE certificate for your building contact us at info@usrc.org

The USRC Rating Process

Select rating type: VERIFIED or Transaction

Owner selects Certified Rating Professional (CRP)

CRP performs building evaluation

Apply to USRC for Building Rating

USRC performs Technical Review

(we will work with your CRP to perform the review)

USRC awards Building Rating

(We will award a rating within 48 hours for most Transaction Ratings and two weeks for most Verified Ratings)

Disclaimer

USRC Rating Definitions have been derived from technical publications originally developed by the Structural Engineers Association of Northern California (SEAONC). SEAONC granted the USRC permission to use these documents. Any differences between USRC Ratings and related SEAONC documents are solely the work of the USRC and do not reflect any opinion, endorsement, or approval by SEAONC. While US codes and engineering practices are among the most advanced in the world, evaluations of building performance subject to natural disasters include a significant amount of uncertainty: unknowns related to forecasting actual event location, size and duration, the actual intensity to which the building is subject, and the quality of the building design and construction. Current building analysis, evaluation and correlation methods do not address or remove all these sources of uncertainty. Due to many factors including but not limited to variations in construction, differing site conditions, and variations in natural and man-made events, the performance evaluation of a single building includes a significant amount of uncertainty.